Resource Library

This Library contains research, promising practices, public education, and training related to violence against women and children.

The Learning Network strives to bring current, accessible, and up-to-date content to the Resource Library. We aim to link primarily to open-access research, however, at times we do link to some content we think is particularly significant but that is inaccessible due to the subscription restrictions imposed by journals and publishing companies. While we are unable to purchase access to this content, we hope that bringing awareness of this research to our readers can assist in their learning endeavours. We will continue to work on providing open-access content so that our readers can have access to the most-current and up-to-date research available.
The intersection of settlement and housing services and policies: Reducing the risk of homelessness for immigrant and refugee women (2015)

This research report looks at barriers and promising practices that can be used by the immigrant and refugee-serving sector and housing service providers to support this immigrant and refugee women at risk of homelessness. Linkages between the two sectors, which often operate in siloes, are highlighted. Sixteen recommendations aimed at various stakeholders are discussed.

The intersection of settlement and housing services and policies: Reducing the risk of homelessness for immigrant and refugee women (2015)

This research report looks at barriers and promising practices that can be used by the immigrant and refugee-serving sector and housing service providers to support this population. Linkages between the two sectors, which often operate in siloes, are highlighted. Sixteen recommendations aimed at various stakeholders are discussed.

The Intersectional Oppressions of South Asian Immigrant Women and Vulnerability in Relation to Domestic Violence: A Case Study (2017)

This article examines various factors that contribute to the multiple forms of oppression experienced by South Asian immigrant women in Canada. Informed by an intersectional perspective, it also focuses on the vulnerability of newcomer immigrant women when experiencing situations of domestic violence. This article is divided into four sections: literature review, case study, factors that intersect to increase vulnerabilities, and recommendations for social work practice and for policy.

The Intersectional Oppressions of South Asian Immigrant Women and Vulnerability in Relation to Domestic Violence: A Case Study (2017)

This 2017 paper uses an intersectional perspective to discuss the simultaneity and multiplicity of oppressions that South Asian immigrant women may experience in situations of domestic violence through the use of an illustrative case study.

The Intersectionality of Domestic Violence and Welfare in the Lives of Poor Women (2002)

This article brings to light the impact of intersectionality in the lives of women living in poverty, who experience domestic violence. This article emphasizes the gaps in social policy regarding the lack of consideration toward intersectionality, which ultimately impacts those accessing social services. The article describes intersectionality, and in detail how it pertains to those who experience domestic violence as well as those who access social services. The article stresses the importance of applying intersectionality in policy to better serve the needs of those accessing social services.

The Intersectionality of Forced Marriage with Other Forms of Abuse in the United States

This 2016 paper provides information and research on forced marriage in the United States and its intersections with child abuse, sexual assault and rape, domestic and family violence, stalking, female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), and human trafficking. The research demonstrates that forced marriage is a serious but neglected problem in this country, and despite many advocates’ best efforts, survivors of forced marriage and those at risk continue to fall through the cracks of the systems and programs set up to protect individuals from abuse.

The Involved Father & Gender Equality Project (n.d.)

In collaboration with Dad Central, White Ribbon conducted a study that explored the positive roles that fathers, organizations working with diverse fathers, and the fatherhood sector in Ontario in general can play in promoting gender equality, healthy and equal relationships, and ending gender-based violence.  The study consisted of focus groups and surveys with 53 fathers in communities across the province, interviews with stakeholders and professionals working on engaging fathers, and a preliminary environmental scan of services available to fathers in Ontario.  Some themes from the findings of the research include: involved fatherhood occurs along a continuum that allows fathers to find ways to actively participate in the lives of their children; fathers should utilize parental leave benefits as a way to be active in family life however parental leave can be isolating and is often frowned upon; involved fatherhood has benefits for children, mothers, and fathers; many fathers are finding ways to counter the traditional gender stereotypes; Aboriginal fathers are teaching their children about Aboriginal culture, history, and heritage in their fatherhood involvement; the use of language is an important part of the parenting process particularly within conversations with Gay/Bi/Transgender fathers; and fathers indicated that their involvement with their children promotes gender equality in many ways.

The Legal Treatment of Marital Rape and Women’s Equality: An Analysis of the Canadian Experience (2010)

Jennifer Koshan (2010)
This is a review paper that addresses how marital rape is treated in the legal system in Canada starting from when it was first criminalized in 1983 to present day. The review discusses Canadian reforms and strategies that may assist other countries in responding to marital rape and identifies strategies from these same countries that may assist Canada in reforming and interpreting current marital rape laws. Topics include a summary of how marital rape and women’s equality is addressed in the Canadian legal system; prevalence rates of sexual violence within marital relationships and indicators of women’s inequality; the impact of sexual violence; the criminalization of marital rape; the legal framework that addresses marital rape in Canada; other laws and policies in Canada that impact how marital rape is treated in the legal system; case examples of the judicial treatment of marital rape; colonial and traditional law perspectives on marital rape; and lessons learned.

The Lesbian Partner Abuse Scale (2002)

This 2002 article by McClennen, Summers, and Daley tests the reliability and validity of the Lesbian Partner Abuse Scale-Revised (LE-PAS-R). The usefulness of the LE-PAS-R as a tool for clinicians to facilitation violence prevention in lesbian relationships is discussed, along with applications for practice.

The Link between Boys' Victimization & Adult Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence: Opportunities for Prevention across the Life Course (2016)

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious, pressing, and preventable public health issue that, while not gender-specific, is overwhelmingly perpetrated against women by men. One risk factor for men’s IPV perpetration is the experience of maltreatment in childhood; that is, neglect, abuse, or exposure to IPV. While it is important to recognize the wide range of factors involved in IPV perpetration, this discussion paper draws attention to the ways in which IPV prevention can be enhanced through identifying men at risk of becoming perpetrators at earlier points in their lives and mitigating the impact of experiences of violence through age-specific intervention programs. Specifically, the aim of this paper is to identify pathways from childhood maltreatment to IPV perpetration in order to highlight these two forms of violence as intricately linked public health issues with implications for prevention across the life course. The report consists of three parts. Part 1 provides theoretical explanations for the connection between victimization as a boy and IPV perpetration as an adult, and reviews the evidence supporting this link. Part 2 outline primary, secondary, and tertiary modes of prevention, with specific discussion of evidence-based and promising prevention programs for boys and men by life stage. Part 3 provides considerations and future directions for health and its community partners. We also invite you to read our newsletter, based on this report, here.

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