Resource Library

This Library contains research, promising practices, public education, and training related to violence against women and children.

The Learning Network strives to bring current, accessible, and up-to-date content to the Resource Library. We aim to link primarily to open-access research, however, at times we do link to some content we think is particularly significant but that is inaccessible due to the subscription restrictions imposed by journals and publishing companies. While we are unable to purchase access to this content, we hope that bringing awareness of this research to our readers can assist in their learning endeavours. We will continue to work on providing open-access content so that our readers can have access to the most-current and up-to-date research available.
A Best Practices Guide to Intersectional Approaches in Psychological Research (2008)

This 2008 article discusses the practical application of intersectionality in empirical research, using psychology as an example. It outlines how to decide which intersections of identities to use, comparing identities, and understanding identity within a social structural context. This is an abstract only.  You can access the full article through the library, society membership, or by online purchase.

A comparative analysis of victims of sexual assault with and without mental health histories: acute and follow-up care characteristics (2013)

This exploratory study examines 467 cases of sexual assault presented at the Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Care Centre in Ontario, Canada in order to characterize the victims of sexual assault as seen by a sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) and to compare victims with and without preexisting self-reported mental health issues.  A total of 158 (33.8%) cases involved a victim of sexual assault with at least one preexisting mental health issue (most victims reported anxiety and depression followed by bipolar spectrum disorders, substance abuse and addiction problems, psychotic spectrum disorders, self-harm/suicidal ideation, eating disorders, and borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder.  Victims of sexual assault with preexisting mental health issues were compared to victims without a preexisting mental health issue.  Results indicated that victims with a preexisting mental health issue were more likely to be older; taking prescription medications; and to be vaginally, orally, and anally penetrated during the sexual assault.  However, they were less likely to experience a drug-facilitated sexual assault.  No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of acute care characteristics (e.g., receiving emergency contraception, HIV PEP starter kits, and counselling referrals) and on-site follow-up care characteristics (e.g., giving a phone number, coming in for follow-up visit, and having any HIV testing).  You can access the full article through the library system or through a paid membership account.

A comparison of intimate partner and other sexual assault survivors’ use of different types of specialized hospital-based violence services (2017)

This 2017 paper investigates the health service utilization of women sexually assaulted by their intimate partners, as compared with those sexually assaulted by other perpetrators. It finds that women sexually assaulted by current or former intimate partners utilized services offered by sexual assault and domestic violence treatment centres differently, including having their injuries documented and undergoing safety planning, than those assaulted by other known assailants and strangers.

A Comprehensive Review of the Literature on the Impact of Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence for Children and Youth (2014)

This 2014 review presents findings from a comprehensive review of the literature on the impact of exposure to intimate partner violence for children and youth, focusing on: (a) neurological disorders; (b) physical health outcomes; (c) mental health challenges; (d) conduct and behavioural problems; (e) delinquency, crime, and victimization; and (f) academic and employment outcomes.

A Coordinated Community Response to Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence Experienced by Immigrant and Newcomer Women in New Brunswick (2016)

This needs assessment is part of a 36 month project aiming to improve service responses for immigrant and newcomer women who are in victims of domestic and intimate partner violence (D/IVP) in New Brunswick. Key themes from individual interviews and focus groups with immigrant women and service providers are discussed. Potential collaborative strategies to reduce and/or eliminate D/IPV are provided.

A Coordinated Community Response to Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence Experienced by Immigrant and Newcomer Women in New Brunswick (2016)

This needs assessment is part of a 36 month project aiming to improve service responses for immigrant and newcomer women who are in victims of domestic and intimate partner violence (D/IVP) in New Brunswick. Key themes from individual interviews and focus groups with immigrant women and service providers are discussed. Potential collaborative strategies to reduce and/or eliminate D/IPV are provided.

A Definition of Consent to Sexual Activity (2011)

Criminal Code of Canada (2011)
This is section 273.1 of the criminal code of Canada that defines consent for the purpose of determining whether a sexual assault offence has occurred in eyes of the law. The section also describes specific situations where consent is not or cannot be given.

A Dialogue Approach to Ending Violence Against Muslim Women in Montreal (2017)

The objective of this 2017 toolkit is to equip the Imams, who are leaders of the Mosques in Montreal, on how to address cases of conjugal violence in their communities, while leveraging the resources that exist in the Montreal social services network.

A First Nations Woman with Disabilities: “Listen to what I am saying!” (2007)

This exploratory and qualitative study describes the courageous story of a First Nations woman living with severe disAbilities in an urban city. The personal story of Hope describes issues of grief, racism, verbal and sexual abuse, healthcare concerns, isolation, poverty, relationships, resisting child welfare, and sexuality. Hope’s story is a learning opportunity for all health and social service providers.

A Focus on Family Violence in Canada (2016)

This 2016 report sheds light on a topic that can be hard to talk about: family violence. Family violence often remains hidden. Working together, the report notes that we can unravel why, when, where, how, and to whom family violence happens and improve our efforts to support healthy Canadian families.

Pages