10 Reasons Why Housing Issues in Canada Put Youth at Risk

This inforgraphic lists 10 reasons why youth in Canada are put at risk due to housing issues.

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Housing issues occur when youth do not have access to stable housing, nor the means to secure housing.i

It can be visible as in a youth sleeping outdoors (sleeping rough) or staying in shelters. It can be hidden as in a youth couch surfing. 35,000 – 40,000 youth experience housing issues in Canada during the year. On a given night, that may be 6,000 – 7,000 youth sleeping rough or in shelter.ii

57.8% of youth experiencing housing issues report current or past involvement with the child welfare system.iii

About 20-40% of youth living with housing issues identify as LGBTQ2S.iv

Nearly 80% of youth experiencing housing issues reported leaving home because of family conflict. 63% reported childhood trauma and abuse.v

83% of youth facing housing issues reported bullying in school, which is four times more than Canadian youth in general.vi

63% of youth experiencing housing issues were victimized (e.g. sexual assault, theft) on more than one occasion.vii

Young women facing housing issues are among the most vulnerable to sex trafficking.viii

Housing issues for youth are associated with challenges in academic success, mental health difficulties, worsening physical health, substance use, street crime, and precarious employment.ix Government, service providers, and communities must work together to keep youth safe. Join us in ending violence. i

Canadian Observatory on Homelessness (2012) Canadian Definition of Homelessness. Homeless Hub: www.homelesshub.ca/homelessdefinition/ii

Stephen Gaetz, Bill O’Grady, Sean Kidd & Kaitlin Schwan. (2016). Without a Home: The National Youth Homelessness Survey. Toronto: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press. Available online: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/WithoutAHome-final.pdfiii

Nichols, N., Schwan, K., Gaetz, S., Redman, M., French, D., Kidd, S., O’Grady, B. (2017). Child Welfare and Youth Homelessness in Canada: A Proposal for Action. Toronto: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press. Available online: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/ChildWelfare-PolicyBrief-final_0.pdfiv

Abramovich, A., & Shelton, J. (Eds.). (2017). Where Am I Going to Go? Intersectional Approaches to Ending LGBTQ2S Youth Homelessness in Canada & the U.S. Toronto: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press. Available online: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Where_Am_I_Going_To_Go.pdfv

Stephen Gaetz, Bill O’Grady, Sean Kidd & Kaitlin Schwan. (2016). Without a Home: The National Youth Homelessness Survey. Toronto: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press. Available online: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/WithoutAHome-final.pdfvi

Stephen Gaetz, Bill O’Grady, Sean Kidd & Kaitlin Schwan. (2016). Without a Home: The National Youth Homelessness Survey. Toronto: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press. Available online: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/WithoutAHome-final.pdfvii

Stephen Gaetz, Bill O’Grady, Sean Kidd & Kaitlin Schwan. (2016). Without a Home: The National Youth Homelessness Survey. Toronto: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press. Available online: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/WithoutAHome-final.pdfviii

Canadian Women’s Foundation. (2014). “No More” Ending Sex-Trafficking in Canada Report. Available online: http://canadianwomen.org/sites/canadianwomen.org/files/NO%20MORE.%20Task%20Force%20Report.pdfix

Stephen Gaetz, Bill O’Grady, Sean Kidd & Kaitlin Schwan. (2016). Without a Home: The National Youth Homelessness Survey. Toronto: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press. Available online: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/WithoutAHome-final.pdf