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This Glossary provides a central place to find the meaning of key terms in Gender-Based Violence (GBV) work and to access resources for further learning. It will grow and change as the GBV field does. If you find a term should be added or revised, please contact us at vawln@uwo.ca

You can view the terms associated with a letter by selecting the letter below. Crossed out letters do not have any terms. You can also click here for a PDF of all the included terms.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Dating Violence

“A type of intimate partner violence often referred to in the context of adolescent relationships. It occurs between two people in a dating relationship and involves physical, psychological, and sexual abuse.” [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] Etherington, N. A., & Baker, L. (2018). Preventing Revictimization and Use of Aggression Following Girls’ Maltreatment: A life course approach. Learning Nework Issue-Based Newsletter #6. London, Ontario: Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women & Children. ISBN 978-1-988412-20-7  Retrieved from http://www.vawlearningnetwork.ca/our-work/reports/discussion_paper_18.html

Discrimination

Discrimination is behaviour that results from prejudiced attitudes by individuals or institutions, resulting in unequal outcomes for persons who are perceived as different. It is the unfair treatment due to a “Prohibited Ground” under the Human Rights Code, which includes race, sex, sexual orientation, gender orientation and gender expression, same sex partner status, colour, ancestry, place of origin, ethnic origin, marital status, age, disability, citizenship, family status, or religion.

Discrimination includes, but is not restricted to, the denial of equal treatment, civil liberties and opportunities to individuals or groups with respect to education, accommodation, health care, employment and access to services, goods and facilities. [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] Canadian Human Rights Commission. (2002). What is Discrimination? Retrieved from https://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/eng/content/what-discrimination

Dissociation

“Dissociation is a coping strategy to manage overwhelming experiences. In the absence of stress, the mind is able to collect all the information around us – sensations, feelings, thoughts, behaviours and identity – and use it to make sense of one’s experience. This means that at any given moment we know who we are, where we are, what we are thinking and feeling, and so on. However, in an overwhelming or unbearable situation, a person may dissociate, or protect herself by disconnecting from aspects of what she is experiencing. This makes the situation momentarily tolerable. When one dissociates, one or more pieces of information are cut off from the self, resulting in a fragmented or confusing sense of oneself or of the experience. When there is chronic traumatization, dissociation may become a well-practiced strategy that can lead to problems in daily life and/or increase one’s vulnerability to additional harm. For example, individuals who dissociate regularly may: feel as though there are large periods of time when they don’t know what happened; find themselves in places without any memory of how they got there; find evidence that they have engaged in some activity – for example, gone shopping – but not have any memory of it; be told they were acting different or strange; have others insist they know them from somewhere, but have no memory of meeting this person.” [1]

Footnotes:

[1] Women's College Hospital. (n.d.). Mental health signs and symptoms. Retrieved from https://www.womenshealthmatters.ca/health-centres/mental-health/trauma/signs-and-symptoms

Domestic Homicide

“Domestic homicide is defined as the killing of a current or former intimate partner, their child(ren), and/or other third parties. An intimate partner can include people who are in a current or former married, common-law, or dating relationship. Other third parties can include new partners, other family members, neighbours, friends, co-workers, helping professionals, bystanders, and others killed as a result of the incident. Domestic homicide is a form of gender-based violence rooted in historical patterns of inequality, exclusion and discrimination.” [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative. (2013). Domestic homicide in Canada. Retrieved from http://cdhpi.ca/sites/cdhpi.ca/files/Fact_Sheet_1_DH-in-Canada.pdf

 

Domestic Violence Court (DVC) Program

“In DVC programs, domestic violence cases are heard separately from other criminal law cases by specific judges who are trained about violence between intimate partners and familiar with the issues involved in these types of cases. The program also includes special training about intimate partner violence for police, Crown lawyers, probation officers and other staff that are involved in the program.” [1]

Footnotes:

[1] Ontario Women's Justice Network. (2016, August). Ontario’s domestic violence court program. Retrieved from http://owjn.org/2016/08/ontarios-domestic-violence-court-program/

Domestic Violence Intervention

“Action taken to stop domestic violence, lessen its effects on the victims and their families, and hold the abuser accountable.” [1] “Domestic Violence Interventions are delivered to either victims or perpetrators after the violence has occurred so as to reduce negative impacts and prevent reoccurrence.” [2]

Footnotes:

[1] Domestic Violence Prevention Committee (2009, June). Deputy Ministers’ Leadership Committee on Family Violence. Retrieved from http://www.gov.ns.ca/just/global_docs/DVPC_recommendations.pdf

[2] Buckle, L., Simpson, B., Berger, S., & Metcalfe, R. (2014, June). Prevention and early intervention for domestic violence. Calgary Women Shelter. Retrieved from https://www.calgarywomensshelter.com/images/pdf/Prevention&EarlyIntervention_DV_FCSSJune2014.pdf

Domestic Violence Prevention

“Actions taken to prevent the onset or repetition of domestic violence. Prevention includes activities and approaches that promote safe, healthy relationships and behaviors.” [1] “Prevention activities can be delivered to the whole population or to groups without regard to individual risk levels (i.e. universal interventions), or to particular groups that are at heightened risk of using or experiencing violence (i.e. selected interventions).” [2]

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Footnotes:

[1] Domestic Violence Prevention Committee (2009, June). Deputy Ministers’ Leadership Committee on Family Violence. Retrieved from http://www.gov.ns.ca/just/global_docs/DVPC_recommendations.pdf

[2] Buckle, L., Simpson, B., Berger, S., & Metcalfe, R. (2014, June). Prevention and early intervention for domestic violence. Calgary Women Shelter. Retrieved from https://www.calgarywomensshelter.com/images/pdf/Prevention&EarlyIntervention_DV_FCSSJune2014.pdf

Domestic Violence Screening

“Domestic violence screening is the process of identifying warning signs for domestic violence. This process is critical for assessing and managing risk for domestic violence. Correct identification of warning signs allows us to assess risk and, where it exists, take appropriate steps to manage it; but missed identification of warning signs represent a lost opportunity to prevent domestic violence and protect potential victims/survivors.” [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] Centre for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children (CREVAWC) (2012).  Domestic Violence Risk Assessment and Management On-Line Training Course. Retrieved from http://onlinetraining.learningtoendabuse.ca/sites/default/files/lessons/DVRAM%20full-text%20December%202012_1.pdf

Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault

“Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSA) occurs when alcohol or other drugs are used to intentionally sedate or incapacitate a person in order to perpetrate non-consensual sexual assault. In essence, a person utilizes incapacitating substances as a weapon to facilitate the sexual assault. The Criminal Code of Canada (section 273.1) defines consent as a “voluntary agreement of the complainant to engage in the sexual activity in question.” Consent cannot be obtained if the person is incapable of consenting to the activity (i.e., the person is drunk, stoned, unconscious)…There are two types of DFSA:

  1. Proactive – a perpetrator puts a drug into a victim’s drink or gives a victim alcohol until she becomes inebriated and incapacitated
  2. Opportunistic – a perpetrator targets an already intoxicated or incapacitated victim.” [1]


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Footnotes:

[1] Campbell, M. (May 2014).  Drug facilitated sexual assault. Learning Network Brief (20). London, Ontario: Learning Network, Centre for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children. Retrieved from http://www.vawlearningnetwork.ca/sexual‐violence