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This Glossary provides a central place to find the meaning of key terms in Gender-Based Violence (GBV) work and to access resources for further learning. It will grow and change as the GBV field does. If you find a term should be added or revised, please contact us at vawln@uwo.ca

You can view the terms associated with a letter by selecting the letter below. Crossed out letters do not have any terms. You can also click here for a PDF of all the included terms.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Barrier

Just as physical barriers can present an obstacle to physical movement or accessing physical objects, social barriers consist of social obstacles that either overtly or covertly “prevent a person from fully taking part in all aspects of society,” including (but not limited to) accessing various spaces or resources. [1]

Depending on the circumstances, certain beliefs, policies, traditions, institutions, or social environments may constitute barriers that “prevent or limit a person’s access to opportunities, benefits, or advantages that are available to other members of society.” [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] The 519. (n.d.). Glossary of Terms.  Retrieved from: http://www.the519.org/education-training/glossary

Batterers’ Intervention Programs (Programming Responses for Intimate Partner Violence)

Batter Intervention Programs “were first developed in the late 1970s based on concerns expressed by advocates for abused women.”

The initial goals of these programs remain applicable today: “(a) Changing beliefs and attitudes that justify intimate partner violence, (b) Providing the skills to stop abusive actions, and (c) Preventing recidivism. Programs differ in their clinical approaches to helping batterers acknowledge their behavior and stop behaving abusively.” [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] Tutty, L. M., Babins-Wagner, R., & Rothery, M. A. (2019). The responsible choices for men IPV offender program: Outcomes and a comparison of court-mandated to non-court-mandated men. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 1-22. doi:10.1080/10926771.2019.1578316

Best Practices

‘Best Practices’ refer to programs or components of programs or delivery methods that have been identified as most effective (i.e. produce significant reductions in poor outcomes or associated risk factors or significant increase in positive outcomes or associated protective factors) by repeated methodologically sound studies using an experimental (RCT [Randomized Controlled Trial]) or quasi-experimental design.” [1]

Footnotes:

[1] Calgary Women Shelter. (2014, June 12). Prevention and early intervention for domestic violence. Retrieved from https://www.calgarywomensshelter.com/images/pdf/Prevention&EarlyIntervention_DV_FCSSJune2014.pdf

Bi-Directional Violence

“Bilateral violence is a controversial concept and experts do not agree about its characteristics. It occurs when both partners within a relationship are violent towards each other. Understanding this issue is challenging. Data on intimate partner violence are not always collected to reflect that relationships can be complex and dynamic. Data can also span a wide spectrum of behaviours, from unhealthy conflict (sometimes known as common couple violence) in a relationship to severe physical and psychological abuse (sometimes known as intimate terrorism).” [1]

Footnotes:

[1] Chief Public Health Officer. (2016). Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2016 - A Focus on Family Violence in Canada. Retrieved from http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/publications/department-ministere/state-public-health-family-violence-2016-etat-sante-publique-violence-familiale/alt/pdf-eng.pdf

Biphobia

“Negative attitudes, feelings, or irrational aversion to, fear or hatred of bisexual people and their communities, or of behaviours stereotyped as bisexual, leading to discrimination, harassment or violence against bisexual people.” [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] The 519. (n.d.). The 519 Glossary of Terms. Retrieved from http://www.the519.org/education-training/glossary

Bullying

Bullying is characterized by acts of intentional harm, repeated over-time, in a relationship where an imbalance of power exists. It includes physical actions (punching, kicking, biting), verbal actions (threats, name calling, insults, racial or sexual comments), and social exclusion (spreading rumours, ignoring, gossiping, excluding).” [1]

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Footnotes:

[1] National Crime Prevention Centre. (2008). Bullying Prevention: Nature and Extent of Bullying in Canada.  Ottawa, ON: Public Safety Canada.  Retrieved from https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/bllng-prvntn/bllng-prvntn-eng.pdf